The Matter of Violence in Baroque Painting
Title
The Matter of Violence in Baroque Painting
Price
€ 107,00
ISBN
9789463727808
Format
Hardback
Number of pages
184
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
17 x 24 cm
Also available as
eBook PDF - € 106,99
Table of Contents
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Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
List of Images
An Introduction
Chapter One. Wound: On Caravaggio’s Martyrdom of Saint Ursula
Chapter Two. Touch: On Giovanni Lanfranco’s Saint Peter Healing Saint Agatha
Chapter Three. Skin: On Jusepe de Ribera’s Martyrdom of Saint Bartholomew
Chapter Four. Flesh: On Georges de la Tour’s Penitent Saint Jerome
Chapter Five. Blood: On Artemisia Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes
Chapter Six. Death: On Francisco de Zurbarán’s Martyrdom of Saint Serapion
Conclusion
General Bibliography
Index

Bogdan Cornea

The Matter of Violence in Baroque Painting

Baroque depictions of violence are often dismissed as ‘over the top’ and ‘excessive’. Their material richness and exciting visual complexity, together with the visceral engagement they demand from beholders, are usually explained in literature as reflecting the presumed violence of early modern society. This book explores the intersection between materiality, excess, and violence in seventeenth-century paintings through a close analysis of some of the most iconic works of the period. Baroque paintings expose or reference their materiality by insisting on various physical changes wrought through violence. This study approaches violence as the work of materiality, which has the potential to analogously stage pictorial surfaces as corporeal surfaces, where paint becomes flayed flesh, canvas threads ruptured skin, and red paint spilt blood.
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Author

Bogdan Cornea

Dr Bogdan Cornea is a writer and independent scholar who earned his PhD in History of Art from the University of York. He has published articles on the relationship between materiality and violence in the art of Jusepe de Ribera and on the art and architecture of eighteenth century Romania.