The Impact of Losing Your Job
Title
The Impact of Losing Your Job
Subtitle
Unemployment and Influences from Market, Family, and State on Economic Well-Being in the US and Germany
Price
€ 106,00
ISBN
9789089648051
Format
Hardback
Number of pages
264
Language
English
Publication date
Dimensions
15.6 x 23.4 cm
Also available as
eBook PDF - € 0,00
Table of Contents
Show Table of ContentsHide Table of Contents
1 Introduction 2 Life Courses and Trigger Events: Theoretical Considerations 3 Welfare State Institutions and Labor Market Trends 4 Data and Methods 5 The Incidence of Job Loss and Unemployment 6 Income Trajectories After Job Loss 7 Household Strategies to Buffer Job Loss 8 Conclusion

Martin Ehlert

The Impact of Losing Your Job

Unemployment and Influences from Market, Family, and State on Economic Well-Being in the US and Germany

Losing a job has always been understood as one of the most important causes of downward social mobility in modern societies. And it's only gotten worse in recent years, as the weakening position of workers has made re-entering the labour market even tougher. The Impact of Losing Your Job builds on findings from life course sociology to show clearly just what effects job loss has on income, family life, and future prospects. Key to Ehlert's analysis is a comparative look at the United States and Germany that enables him to show how different approaches to welfare state policies can ameliorate the effects of job loss-but can at the same time make labour insecurity more common.
As of 1 November 2022, we are moving our UK and ROW distributor. During this cross-over period, our web shop is unavailable for these regions. To order, please email amsterdam.csd@wiley.com or call +44 (0)1243 843291 (open 8.00-17:15 GMT)
+
Order from North America External Link
Author

Martin Ehlert

Martin Ehlert is a researcher at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He has recently published journal articles in Social Science Research, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, and Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie.